Kronos Training Reference Guide Basics

Dwain Lambrigger — Apr 2010

Making a better Reference Guide - Like reference aids, a reference guide is a very important deliverable in a Kronos training program; one with unique characteristics that separate it from the reference aid and the training manual. A reference guide is designed to be flexible. Originally, a reference guide was intended as a post training event tool for learners that didn't want to invest time searching through a large and detailed training manual for answers to their specific questions.

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"Please get the milk" or "Kronos Pay Codes?"

Jeff Millard — Apr 2010

If you have been following the last few blogs on strategic reconciliation in the Kronos WFM environment you know that I have been digging up some rather old but timeless principles about strategy and tactics from Sun Tzu the 6th century BC Chinese military leader. I promised that in this edition I would rejoin modern society and showcase these principles at work in two actual WFM implementations. More specifically, the actual consequences of ignoring these principles as well as the salvation of applying them.

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Cool Kronos stuff found today

Bryan deSilva — Apr 2010

Remember when you upgraded to 6.x and had to decide what to do with your 4,000 crystal reports? Edward has written a helpful article about the fun we can have when setting up KRONOS to run Crystal Reports via the Business Objects Enterprise server.

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Kronos Reference Aid Basics - What Makes them Valuable?

Dwain Lambrigger — Apr 2010

A reference aid is a one page, double sided document that describes the steps necessary to complete tasks in Kronos Workforce Central. The reference aid is designed to be used by employees on the job as needed. Often reference aids are posted in a common area for a group; for example, near a Timekeeper Terminal to be used by everyone in an area. Reference aids are also commonly pinned to a wall in a cubicle, or taped to a monitor. Though used in different places, the goal is the same, easy access.  

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Kronos Implementation Strategy or Tactics?

Jeff Millard — Apr 2010

In my last blog in this series introducing the concepts of strategic reconciliation I touched on the elements of strategy itself. Our guest commentator was the Chinese general, Sun Tzu, who was a mover-and-shaker in the shock-and-awe business in the 6th century BC but whose theories have also been effectively translated and employed in other disciplines. Two of his ideas I revealed last time are pillars of the Kronos product line strategic reconciliation effort we employ with shock-and-awe at Improvizations. These ideas have some interesting parallels with Sun Tzu’s The art of War:

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