The Kronos Guy Blog

Kronos Oracle to SQL Server Migration – SS Agent hiccup – Part 3

Bryan deSilva — May 2011

In our prior posts we described some of the human-ware issues encountered dealing with the degree of access that Javed Iqbal, a Kronos employee and migration expert, was granted. Javed is using SQL Server Migration Assistant for Oracle (SSMA4O) version 4.2.

Read More

You want Kronos 6.2 with that?

Jeff Millard — May 2011

A customer of ours has engaged us to help them re-engineer their Kronos timekeeping and scheduling environment. We recently suggested to them that upgrading to the latest version of Kronos from their slightly earlier version might be desirable as part of the project already underway. Although some leeway was granted to do a test upgrade and assess the pros and cons, the idea was nixed before a formal review was completed.

Read More

Kronos Upgrades. How Do You Train for That?

Dwain Lambrigger — May 2011

With the announcement of Kronos WFC version 6.2, a flood of organizations have been quick to upgrade. This makes sense, as there are a lot of new features that improve and integrate Workforce Timekeeper like never before.  As training specialists, we spend a lot of time thinking about the training implementation for a new application, but what about an upgrade? How do you plan for that? Is it just like an implementation, but smaller? There are a lot of good questions there, let's try to answer them one at a time while understanding the goals for training for a new application upgrade. 

Read More

Kronos Oracle to SQL Server Migration – Performance – Part 2

Bryan deSilva — May 2011

This is part of the post-blog response started by this overview of Migrating from Oracle to SQL Server, and deals with experiences with Kronos migrations, again by our SQL Server guru friend Ken Lassesen.

Read More

Where were you when the page was blank?

Jeff Millard — May 2011

My father used to ask his young engineer recruits “Where were you when the page was blank?” when they complained about the design of something existing that they had to interface too. On the face of it the question implies they should have spoken up much earlier. The subtext, however, was usually that since the design often pre-dated the young engineer’s birth he or she may not yet have sufficient seniority to be disparaging other’s designs. It also reminded people that the original designers designed to the original requirements not to what came along years later with new concepts, methods, tools, or technologies in the mix. So basically if you weren’t in the room when all those requirements were being discovered and decided upon then you probably have no basis to comment. Until my father’s engineers learned this they weren’t invited to anymore design discussions.

Read More

Kronos Test Planning for ‘when all bets are off’

Cindy Hagen — May 2011

‘When all bets are off’ --  an expression meaning a situation in which one factor alone can change or cancel out everything. *      

Read More

I Dream of Genies... Being Used. Workforce Genies that is

Jeffry Charnow — May 2011

The idea of a Genie, a being that could bring you whatever you wished for, is a pretty cool idea.  Let’s think about it from a Kronos Workforce Central point of view for a minute. What information do you wish to see as soon as you log in to Timekeeper? As a Shift Leader, you may want to see shift information; Schedulers would like to see schedule information; Managers, those shift exceptions as soon as the shift is over. Different people have different wishes. Kronos Genies allow these information wishes to come true.

Read More

Need to Know (what to know, you know?)

Dwain Lambrigger — May 2011

Part of the great challenge in building a Kronos Training Implementation...

is working with a customer to help them understand what they need to know. Commonly, Kronos will do this in a workshop at the start of the implementation. However, that workshop often takes place MONTHS before training can begin. It's really easy to forget things in that amount of time. By the time you start running a discovery, the customer has already forgotten a lot of the features they decided they were going to use.  

Read More

Subscribe to Email Updates


Posts by Month

see all